Category Archives: Studies

meet the muse: Fort Point, San Francisco

The personally creative side of my photography goes through variations of inspiration and focus.  Sometimes I have the time and energy to create extensive, comprehensive bodies of work, and sometimes my muses emerge over long periods of study, often with many returns to the same subject over many, many years.

My love of Fort Point, San Francisco, began as a child with an old manual SLR camera and countless rolls of black and white film.  It was a place my family would frequently stop to visit on our way into or out of ‘the City’ when visiting with friends or playing tour guide to visitors from out-of-state.  These two shots are from one of those early rolls of film, scanned ages ago when the at-home scanning technology was still rather limiting.

We likely visited Fort Point so often due to my father’s photography hobby, which I suspect led him to love the place then as much as I do now; with an overwhelming array of juxtapositions, angles, textures, layers of light and shadow, the intersection of Fort Point and the Golden Gate Bridge is a photographer’s paradise.

Now, I’m the one pitching it to visiting friends who want to spend a day in San Francisco, and it’s likely that for many years I’ve always managed to end the day at this historic spot, camera in-hand, without really thinking about my ulterior motives.  Fort Point has emerged as one of my most beloved muses and I never tire of hunting out the details and architectural compositions that I find so interesting there.

Explore more of Fort Point, San Francisco in my archives.  Fine Art prints and Editorial licensing options are available; please note that due to the range of resolutions and cameras used over the years, some photographs will be available in larger sizes than others.

For canvas, metal, and unframed archival prints, please click here.

 

if you only knew…

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I have long loved seeing familiar landscapes from unfamiliar perspectives, and an aerial view of the earth always invites the eye to pause and take in the details. Sometimes the effect is as if a map has come alive, and our minds seek to become oriented within the relationships of geographic features and man-made structures.

For me, the most captivating details are the ways in which the effects of time are made visible on the landscape, and to really see the larger features and their accompanying textural details, one must take to the air. This image is one of many in an ongoing series of fine art aerial landscape photographs, ‘time will tell‘, in which I am exploring the nuances of the North American landscape and the subtle stories it may have to share.

Curtains: newly released abstract photography prints

curtains, rain and passing landscapeFrom recent travels in California, this short series of abstract rain and landscape photographs was shot from a moving train.  I’ve released them as fine art photography prints, offering a quiet and moody visual experience.  As light is captured and scattered by each water-drop caught on the window, the lush green and warm earth tones of an agricultural landscape softly fill the background, occasionally interrupted by the gray concrete and distinct lines of urban infrastructure.  Travel, and particularly train travel, can be a very contemplative undertaking, and I created these images while thinking about the recent challenges of a very transitional time in my life.  It is my hope that these photographs may speak to others as well, and offer an opportunity to reflect on life in it’s abstract, fleeting beauty.

Find the full set of “curtains 1-5” in my archives, with new fine art abstract photography print galleries to be added soon.

fresh flowers

“Flowers…are a proud assertion that a ray of beauty out-values all the utilities of the world.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

Floral stock photos and flowery fine art prints abound in the APK Photography archives.

Crossing, studies 1 & 2

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“Good composition is like a suspension bridge – each line adds strength and takes none away.”
Robert Henri, (25 June 1865 – 12 July 1929)

one structure can take many forms

Working through my archives, I recently spent some time processing a handful of architectural shots from a trip to San Francisco last year. These two images were shot on the same day, and depict different angles on the same windows and balconies of one building.

This image intrigued me, with looming rows of railings, the couple hidden in the shadows, and the layers of squared corners and circles at the top. The tone and texture of the building against the blue sky seems to add another layer of interest, as it is difficult to decide whether this building might be a modern experiment from years past, or some possibly futuristic structure.

forms of imprisonment (1)

The second image frames one edge of the angular building in the heavy concrete of a foreground structure. I chose to work in black and white for this view, as the elements of interest are all caught up in the layered angles, and in the balance of light and shadow as the afternoon light settles across the skyline.

It is important for me to routinely challenge my eye with these comparisons, as it can take so little to bring an entirely new meaning to a photograph. Which interpretation of this building do you prefer?

Adrift in a jellyfish exhibit

Had the pleasure of an after-hours visit to the Monterey Bay Aquarium last week, to see the new jellyfish exhibit. The previous jellyfish exhibit that closed a few years ago was a favorite haunt for photographing interesting movement and low-light compositions, and the new exhibit offers many opportunities to observe and photograph these beautifully surreal creatures.

Surrounded by moon jellyfish

This room in particular offers some exciting photographic challenges, as the cylindrical tanks are arranged in a room of mirrors, with tantalizing glimpses of infinity and interesting arrangements of light and shadow. Can you spot the photographer? It can be tricky to get out of the shot here!

adrift

These bright blue and white polka-dotted jellyfish are some of my favorites, with their intricate structures and vivid colors. To see more of these and other jellyfish, check out my library of ocean photographs at www.apkphotography.com!